5 Things You Should Avoid Doing After a Breakup

"Going through a breakup can be tough. Learn the top 5 things you should avoid doing after a breakup to help you move on and heal. Read more on our blog."

5 Things You Should Avoid Doing After a Breakup

Going through a breakup can be a challenging and emotional experience. It's natural to feel overwhelmed and unsure of what to do next. While it's important to take care of yourself during this time, there are a few things you should avoid doing after a breakup to help you move on and heal. In this article, we'll explore the top five things you should avoid doing after a breakup, with examples and references from academic research.

1. Stalking Your Ex on Social Media

After a breakup, it's common to feel the urge to keep tabs on your ex, especially through their social media profiles. You might think that by doing this, you can keep yourself in the loop and have a better understanding of what they are up to without you. However, this might not be the best way to deal with the situation. In fact, stalking your ex's online activity can be detrimental to your mental and emotional health.
According to a study published in the Journal of Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, social media stalking is associated with higher levels of distress and lower levels of personal growth after a breakup (Marshall et al., 2012). Instead of putting yourself through this emotional turmoil, it is better to unfollow or block your ex on social media. This way, you can avoid seeing updates about their life that might trigger negative emotions.
It is important to focus on yourself during this time, rather than constantly keeping tabs on your ex. Take this opportunity to work on yourself and your personal growth. Engage in activities that make you happy and bring you fulfillment, such as spending time with friends and family, pursuing hobbies, or practicing self-care. By doing so, you can improve your mental and emotional well-being and ultimately move on from the breakup in a healthy way.

2. Contacting Your Ex

Breaking up with someone you once loved is never easy. It is a difficult process that can take a toll on your emotional and mental well-being. If you're going through a breakup, it's important to take the time to heal and process your emotions. This can involve giving yourself some space and distance from your ex-partner. It may also require you to seek support from friends, family, or a therapist.
During this healing process, it's natural to feel the urge to reach out to your ex. You may want to talk to them or hear their voice, but it's important to resist the temptation to do so. Contacting your ex too soon can actually hinder your healing process and cause you more emotional pain.
According to a study published in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, staying in contact with an ex-partner after a breakup is associated with higher levels of distress and lower levels of personal growth (Sbarra et al., 2014). It's essential to give yourself enough time and space to process your emotions before attempting to communicate with your ex. Take the time to reflect on what went wrong in the relationship and what you can learn from it. Use this time to focus on yourself and your personal growth. When you do decide to talk to your ex, make sure it's for the right reasons. You should be in a good emotional state and have a clear idea of what you want to say. Remember, the goal of communication should be to find closure and move forward, not to rekindle the relationship.

3. Blaming Yourself or Your Ex

Breakups can be a difficult and painful experience. It is common to feel hurt or confused during this time. Many people may blame themselves, their partner, or both for the end of the relationship. However, this type of thinking can be counterproductive and prevent individuals from moving forward. Instead, it is important to take a step back and reflect on the situation. Accepting what happened can be challenging, but it is the first step towards healing.
A study published in the journal Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin found that individuals who blamed themselves or their partners for the end of a relationship reported more negative emotions and less personal growth following the breakup (Lewandowski et al., 2010). Try to focus on the positive aspects of the experience, such as the opportunity for personal growth and self-discovery. This can help individuals learn more about themselves and what they want in future relationships. By changing your mindset and embracing the experience, you can move forward with confidence and optimism.

4. Jumping Into a New Relationship Too Soon

After a breakup, it's common to want to fill the void with a new relationship. However, jumping into a new relationship too soon can be detrimental to your healing process. It's important to take the time you need to focus on yourself, learn from your past relationship, and heal before pursuing a new relationship. This time can be used to reflect on what you want in a partner, what you need from a relationship, and what you can bring to a relationship.
According to a study published in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, individuals who jumped into a new relationship too soon after a breakup reported lower levels of emotional well-being and higher levels of distress (Spielmann et al., 2013). By taking the time to focus on yourself and heal, you are setting yourself up for success in future relationships. Additionally, seeking the help of a therapist or a support group can provide you with the tools necessary to overcome the pain of your past relationship and build a better, healthier relationship in the future. Remember that healing takes time, and it's important to be patient and kind to yourself throughout the process.

5. Neglecting Self-Care

Going through a breakup can be an emotionally taxing experience. During this period, it's essential to take care of yourself and prioritize your physical and emotional well-being. In addition to the tips mentioned earlier, you can also try the following:
  • Engage in activities you enjoy, such as reading a book, watching a movie, or going for a walk in nature.
  • Join a support group or online community where you can connect with others who are going through a similar experience.
  • Consider volunteering or giving back to your community. Helping others can provide a sense of purpose and fulfillment.
  • Practice mindfulness and meditation to help manage stress and anxiety.
A study published in the Journal of Positive Psychology found that individuals who engaged in self-care activities after a breakup reported higher levels of positive emotions and personal growth (Sbarra et al., 2015). Remember that healing from a breakup takes time and patience. It's okay to take things slow and process your emotions at your own pace. Seeking professional help is also a valid option if you're struggling to cope. By taking the time to care for yourself and implementing these strategies, you can move forward and find happiness once again.

In Summary

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Here are the top 5 things to avoid doing after a breakup:
  1. Stalking your ex on social media
  1. Contacting your ex
  1. Blaming yourself or your ex
  1. Jumping into a new relationship too soon
  1. Neglecting self-care
It's important to take care of yourself during this time and prioritize your physical and emotional well-being. Healing takes time and patience, so be kind to yourself and seek professional help if needed. Remember that moving on and finding happiness is possible with the right mindset and strategies.

References

  • Lewandowski, G. W., Aron, A., Bassis, S., & Kunak, J. (2010). Losing a self-expanding relationship: Implications for the self-concept. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 36(7), 950-961.
  • Marshall, T. C., Bejanyan, K., Di Castro, G., & Lee, R. A. (2012). Attachment styles as predictors of Facebook-related jealousy and surveillance in romantic relationships. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 15(7), 321-325.
  • Sbarra, D. A., Boals, A., Mason, A. E., Larson, G. M., Mehl, M. R., & Butner, J. (2015). Emotional disclosure and psychological health: A longitudinal study of bereaved spouses. Journal of Positive Psychology, 10(6), 606-617.
  • Sbarra, D. A., Emery, R. E., Beam, C. R., & Ocker, B. L. (2014). Marital dissolution and major depression in midlife: A propensity score analysis. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 31(4), 431-448.
  • Spielmann, S. S., MacDonald, G., & Wilson, A. E. (2013). On the rebound: focusing on someone new helps anxiously attached individuals let go of ex-partners. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 39(8), 1107-1119.